Stuck at the Airport ~ now what?

Daily Post asks: Terminal Time: You’re at the airport, your flight is delayed for six more hours, and none of your electronic devices is (sic) working. How do you pass the time?

I pull out my paperback and continue reading. If I finish it, I pull out the next one in my bag. Alternately, I head direct to the bookstore at the airport and buy a book, grab something to eat, might stop and have a cocktail, meet people, get into some fabulous conversations…

I will say I was on a week long cruise, reading the second volume of the Millennium Trilogy by Stieg Larsson. The first was The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo; the second, The Girl Who Played with Fire; and the third, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest. I tore that ship, all 10-14 stories tall, apart looking for the third book – nothing, nowhere – everybody had the first and the second. When we landed and I made it to the airport, I went immediately to the nearest bookstore within the airport and bought the third one, hard bound… and settled into at least a four or five hour wait, distinctly content to sit and read. What a tense, nail-biting series that was!

Update: my initial picture had the books out of order – agh! Replaced with one that showed the correct order. Heavens! That was a close unforced error!

40 thoughts on “Stuck at the Airport ~ now what?

  1. I consumed all three like a three-course meal. I have no interest in dessert, but I wanted more after the last one.
    I loved the nail biting, the hidden secrets, the discoveries, the payback. Not enough. I still wanted more. I’m a glutton, I see. 😀

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    • Christine, be sure to read them in order. Also, be aware there is strong sexual violence. I didn’t warn one of my friends and she made it a point that I would tell anyone else going forward. That said, I envy you and hope you have nothing going on for the time it takes you to read ‘em. Lucky woman!

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      • Oh, thanks for the warning, will not bother me. I made sure of the availability before I ordered each one, the library network have a zillion copies, one in most towns in our goldfields library area. Almost all are available. 🙂

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  2. I would be hard put to survive any more because I allowed my hubby to sell most of my books when we moved the last time, after my daughter bought me an e-reader. Most of my books are on the e-reader now. But I would head to the nearest bookstore as well & buy something to keep me entertained.

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  3. I was lucky with those books. The german edition was available long before the english and my husband began to read them. He recommended them and as german or english reading is no problem for me, I read the first two and waited a while until the third was published. the first was very good, the second was also quite good but I was a little disappointed with the third. I found the ending was a too long drawn out, and the suspense disappeared. Shame that Stig larsson died so early. He would have definitely written some more best sellers. He was very talented.

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  4. Huntie, When I travelled all the time, my routine was almost identical to yours, except I headed to the bar 1st, to seek the conversation or at least have a place to rest the book. Now the mere thought of having to spend 6 hours inside the airport terminal terrorizing. At the very minimum I would have to find a AC socket that worked for my portable oxygen, that’s assuming I can use it to get from point at to point b. But I am glad you found the third book and had the opportunity to bury yourself in it. Take care, safe travels, Bill

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    • Agh, Bill – you do have challenges. Thanks for pointing that out – my upcoming world. Still and all, don’t you forget your ipod access wherever you journey! Grin.

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  5. Remove that (sic) instantly, woman ! – the singular of the verb is entirely correct !!
    There now; having got that out of the way, back to Stieg, the poor young feller … His so early death caused all manner of suspicions to arise, once his books had been read, of course; but there was nothing underhand – a heart attack at 50. 😦 Not at all normal among the healthy-eating Swedish people …
    How anyone could write such an enormous amount of fiction that all fitted in together is beyond me, Huntie ! – I’d need a crossplot in a spreadsheet and about 20 years, I reckon …
    But how exciting it all was !

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  6. I shall, M.R., just as soon as I’m nearing the end of reading your soul-stealing book. Huntie ~ P.S. “me old china” sounds affectionate, what does it mean, where does it originate from – my brain is scrambling between the old days of the British Empire drinking tea and the Opium Wars or maybe table china? LOL. Clarify for me, pleassseeee?

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  7. I must try those books!
    I was pleased to see your ‘(sic)’. That prompt was obviously written by one of those with a ‘not one’ fixation who do not realise that actually ‘none’ should be regarded as singular or plural, according to sense.

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    • Bless yer heart, Col! M.R. was quite fierce and sure I was wrong… grin. I left it as is. If you do try the books, let me know what you think. It was an amazing diversion – I missed a lot of that cruise…. worth it!

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  8. I resisted reading these books for reasons I no longer remember but when I finally broke down and started the first book, I became completely hooked. LOVED them … the characters, the storylines, the REVENGE! Perfect 🙂

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  9. Okay, so I may have to break down and read them. I read 2 to 3 fiction books a week and normally 1 non-fiction all while I watch Tom sleep. During the moments he’s awake, one of the first things he wants me to do is to start reading exactly where I am at that moment and to continue reading for ten minutes. At the end of ten minutes, if he hasn’t gone back to sleep, I stop and we maybe chat or if he doesn’t feel like talking, he’ll smile a little half smile that I hold so dear in my heart and continue reading aloud until I know he’s asleep again.
    I once thought instead of on the continuation of reading whatever it was that I was reading, I’d always have something close at hand that would be soothing and comforting but he always caught me. He always said if he knew what I was reading he could at least be in a part of my world. I’ve stopped carrying that second book for him and simply read to him whatever I’m reading myself.
    Before the heart surgery, we spent hours upon hours reading the Pacific Paratrooper’s Blog and discussed the history and the volunteer program I built around it at the VA – but for now, we’re back to our normal reading schedule. We hope to pick up the Pacific Paratrooper again soon. Not only is it one of the best blogs regarding WWII, the research is impeccable.

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    • Oh my, Sheri, thank you for the reference to the Pacific Paratrooper’s Blog – I was unaware of it. And, if you say their research is impeccable, then I believe it.

      I think it is wonderful that Tom wants to be engaged and doesn’t care where it starts and ends, just that it is a part of your world and his.

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